Music

Weedon Weekly: 29th July 2017

Music, food and love combine

THE HAPPY HORMONE

My working weeks are so unpredictable that I've decided "Weedon Wednesdays" is a promise I will repeatedly fail to deliver. So I'm changing it to "Weedon Weekly". That is why this offering is being hatched on a Saturday!

Shakespeare said "If music be the food of love, play on!" I wonder if he realised that there was a strong scientific basis to what he wrote? Humankind would agree that good music, tasty food and falling in love are all very pleasant in their way. The interesting fact is that eating, listening to music and feeling love all have an identical effect in the body. They cause the release of dopamine, the so-called 'pleasure chemical'.

Taking the science a step further, it has been discovered that combining music with an outstanding meal or a passionate event means that the tune you were hearing at the time is 'burnt'...

Early kick-off, anyone?

A lovely venue

Can concert start times make a difference to attendance? I ask, as I've just played for the excellent society in Sutton in Ashfield. They tell me that not long ago they were down to audiences of about 40, with the future uncertain. Then they made two changes - one to the venue, moving from a church hall to a modern church, and the other to the start time, pulling it forward to 7:00pm.  Some had their doubts, but once tried this early start has proved popular. Yesterday they continued their recent trend of growing audiences, with 130 squeezed in. I'm sure audience growth leads to more audience growth - the atmosphere was terrific, and in order to get a seat at all the regulars started arriving not long after 6:00pm. The early finish meant that buses were still running, too. I've seen concerts beginning earlier from the typical 8:00pm start of my...

The sound of - silence?

Shoosh!

Here’s a thought to ponder. What is it that makes a piece of music truly thrilling? One might answer the beautiful melody line, the sumptuous harmonies, a fast and furious tempo, huge crescendos and crashing fortissimo at climaxes or even whispered pianissimo passages. But a teacher of mine once surprised me by saying that, in his opinion. it was none of those. What marked a performance out as something special was the use of silence.

When I gave him a bit of a straight look, he asked me if I ever baked a cake. Yes, I did. So what, he enquired, made the difference between a good and a bad cake? I decided it was whether it had risen or not. A fat spongy cake, light with air, was infinitely preferable to a thin, heavy lump. Precisely, he said. And silence gives the lift to a piece of music, just...

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